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6 CO Detector Quick Tips For Homeowners

Posted by William Sherk
William Sherk

Each of us has five senses. Touch, sight, hearing, taste and smell. Now most things in life touch on at least one of these five senses but there is one thing that your senses can’t pick on and that’s carbon monoxide. You can’t taste it, smell it or see it and it is powerful. In fact it can kill you.

Where To Install Carbon Monoxide Detectors

Carbon Monoxide is a colorless, odorless gas that can build up in homes as a result of improperly maintained or malfunctioning gas burning appliances like your stove, your oven, your boiler, furnace and dryer. In fact your gas burning fire place and idling car can expose you to deadly Carbon Monoxide. That’s why the National Fire Protection Association recommends that you install a carbon monoxide detector outside of every sleeping area and bedroom.

The Different Types Of Carbon Monoxide Detectors

There are three basic types of Carbon Monoxide Detectors. The most common is the standard plug in unit. This one isn’t recommended for most homes because CO Detectors should be installed at eye level. Carbon Monoxide is a gas that is slightly lighter than air that rise above where most electrical outlets are located, near the floor.  However, there are other versions of this type of detector that are battery operated and that into a base plate that you can put anywhere. Although the best one to get is the ones that get hardwired right into your electrical system. They do require professional Heating Contractor to install them but run off power from your house and have a battery back up just in case that power goes out.

If you have questions about your Carbon Monoxide Detectors, would like a home safety check or for more Carbon Monoxide Safety Tips give us a call we’d be happy to help you out.

 

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Topics: Carbon Monoxide Safety

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